Medical Students

We have a proud tradition regarding medical student education and are pleased to offer many opportunities.  Dr. Stefan Tigges, an award-winning teacher both locally and nationally, leads our virtual, integrated required third-year Radiology Clerkship.Drs. Amanda Corey and Eugene Berkowitz lead our popular fourth-year Radiology Elective. Our faculty members have been active participants in the Emory anatomy course, some of the second year courses and discovery phase as well as serving as mentors for several research and clinical electives. Carol Dowdle serves as Clerkship Coordinator in our department and has been recognized for her excellent service. Dr. Tigges and Dr. Mark Mullins have been actively involved with the ERIG (Emory Radiology Interest Group) as well.  We have presented nationally regarding our medical student education curriculum and methods. We are proud to be dedicated to and passionate about medical student education. 

Mark E. Mullins, MD, PhD
Director of Radiology Medical Student Education, Emory Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences

Second Year Medical Student Electives

The Department of Radiology offers at least one second year medical student elective each year. Previously offered electives include: 1) Radiology Quality and Safety (taught by Dr. Kimberly E. Applegate), 2) Drawing and Medical Illustration for Medical Students (taught by Dr. Stefan Tigges and Ms. Julia Kjelgaard, Senior Lecturer, Visual Arts) and 3) Clinical Correlation: Anatomy, Pathology and Radiology (supervised by Dr. Stefan Tigges).

Third Year Medical Student Required Clerkship

In 2010, the freestanding two week radiology clerkship was replaced with a two credit hour, letter grade “virtual” clerkship: radiology lectures, small group sessions and shadowing were woven into the seven traditional required clerkships. Medical students have about 40 hours of contact with members of the Radiology Department distributed over the entire third year, with topics appropriate to whatever rotation the student is on. For example, students on the surgery clerkship are shown how imaging can help diagnose the etiology of abdominal pain.  

Students also learn how to approach common imaging studies such as chest radiographs and head CTs. In addition, they learn about the American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria® so that they know if imaging is indicated, and if so, what imaging modality is best. Students also learn 22 "don’t miss" imaging findings like pneumothorax and intracranial bleeding so that important diagnoses are not missed or delayed (Alliance of Medical Student Educators in Radiology (AMSER) http://www.aur.org/amser/). Finally, the students review 16 computer based modules on important topics in imaging such as trauma and read the book “Learning Radiology”. At the end of the third year, the students are tested using a nationally designed and validated computer based exam offered by the Alliance of Medical Student Educators in Radiology (AMSER) and Radiology ExamWeb. The course is run by Dr. Stefan Tigges with Carol Dowdle assisting.

Fourth Year Clinical Elective

A 4-week Clinical Elective in Radiology is also offered by the Emory University School of Medicine and is administrated by Dr. Amanda Corey and Dr. Eugene Berkowitz. This elective provides a varied exposure to the Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences and the numerous subspecialties (Chest, Cardiac, Interventional, Neuroradiology, GI/GU, Mammography, Nuclear Medicine, Musculoskeletal, and Pediatric Radiology) within our Department. This elective covers general radiology topics in didactic sessions that are expected to be useful during your remainder of medical school, internship and/or subsequent clinical practice. Students may select the sites to rotate to best meet their needs and interests.  In addition, students learn about the American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria® so that they know if imaging is indicated, and if so, what imaging modality is best. Students also learn 22 "don’t miss" imaging findings like pneumothorax and intracranial bleeding so that important diagnoses are not missed or delayed (Alliance of Medical Student Educators in Radiology (AMSER) http://www.aur.org/amser/).